Session P26: Superconducting Qubits: Materials / Nanomechanical Resonators

8:00 AM–11:00 AM, Wednesday, March 17, 2010
Room: D136

Sponsoring Unit: GQI
Chair: David Schuster, Yale University

Abstract ID: BAPS.2010.MAR.P26.1

Abstract: P26.00001 : Superconducting microwave resonators - low loss, tunability, and coupling

8:00 AM–8:12 AM

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Authors:

  Haohua Wang
    (University of California, Santa Barbara)

  Radoslaw C. Bialczak
    (University of California, Santa Barbara)

  Mike Lenander
    (University of California, Santa Barbara)

  Erik Lucero
    (University of California, Santa Barbara)

  Matteo Mariantoni
    (University of California, Santa Barbara)

  Matthew Neeley
    (University of California, Santa Barbara)

  Aaron O'Connell
    (University of California, Santa Barbara)

  Daniel Sank
    (University of California, Santa Barbara)

  Martin Weides
    (University of California, Santa Barbara)

  James Wenner
    (University of California, Santa Barbara)

  Tsuyoshi Yamamoto
    (University of California, Santa Barbara)

  Yi Yin
    (University of California, Santa Barbara)

  Andrew Cleland
    (University of California, Santa Barbara)

  John Martinis
    (University of California, Santa Barbara)

The superconducting microwave resonator is an important device for applications such as quantum computation and photon detection. A key parameter characterizing its performance is the energy decay time. We have optimized our superconducting coplanar resonators to achieve an energy decay time around 10 $\mu$s. By fabricating devices with different metals and measuring their quality factors as a function of temperature, power, and cooling field, we have identified an important dissipation mechanism: loss from two-level states at metal-oxide surfaces. We also find that the (classical) measurement of the quality factor at low power is consistent with the energy decay time measured in a (quantum) qubit-resonator swap experiment. Further experiments on tuning the resonator frequency while minimizing dissipation, as well as coupling two resonators, will also be discussed.

To cite this abstract, use the following reference: http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2010.MAR.P26.1